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Process of Oil Painting
Time:2009-06-24
The process of oil painting differs from painter to painter, often but it includes certain customary steps. Firstly, the artist prepares the surface. Although surfaces like linoleum, pressed wood, wooden panel, and cardboard have been used, the most popular surface and often used is canvas. Secondly,the artist prepares a wooden frame called a "stretcher" then the canvas is pulled across the wooden framed and stapled toughly to the back edge. The next step is to apply a ground to isolate the canvas from the acidic qualities of the paint. Thirdly,the process was altered to sizing of rabbit skin glue with following layers of white priming. The artist may apply many required layers of gesso, sanding every smooth after it dries up. Fourthly,the artist may sketch an outline of their subject before applying pigment to the surface. Pigment is normally mixed with oil, usually linseed oil but other oils might be used as well. The painter most often uses a brush to apply the paint. Brushes are normally prepared from different fibers to make different effects. Most artists paint in layers, a method first introduced in the Egg tempera painting technique, and then adapted in Northern Europe for use with linseed oil paints. When the image is finished and dried, an artist will normally seal the work with a layer of varnish usually made from Damar gum crystals dissolved in turpentine. Contemporary artists increasingly defy varnishing their work, desire that the surfaces remain varnish-free indefinitely.
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